Shaun O'Flaherty
MY TECH RESUME

Work:
Sales in an independent computer/tech store since November 2005. We custom-build PC’s, design networks, servers and all the rest. Also an Apple retailer.

Gadgets Owned:
Apple iPhone 4 32GB
Apple MacBook Pro 15in (2007)
Apple iMac G4 17in (£29)
Apple Xserve G4 (£50)
HP TouchPad WiFi 16GB (£89)
Withings WiFi Bathroom Scales
Custom-built HTPC system
Xbox 360
PlayStation 3 (original)
Nintendo Wii (black)
2 x Samsung LED TV’s
Canon PiXMA MP800R
An apartment rigged with CAT6 network cabling
Samsung US-style fridge-freezer

Then there’s all the gadgets I no-longer own ;)

MY TECH RESUME

Work:
Sales in an independent computer/tech store since November 2005. We custom-build PC’s, design networks, servers and all the rest. Also an Apple retailer.

Gadgets Owned:
Apple iPhone 4 32GB
Apple MacBook Pro 15in (2007)
Apple iMac G4 17in (£29)
Apple Xserve G4 (£50)
HP TouchPad WiFi 16GB (£89)
Withings WiFi Bathroom Scales
Custom-built HTPC system
Xbox 360
PlayStation 3 (original)
Nintendo Wii (black)
2 x Samsung LED TV’s
Canon PiXMA MP800R
An apartment rigged with CAT6 network cabling
Samsung US-style fridge-freezer

Then there’s all the gadgets I no-longer own ;)

3 steps to a secure WiFi router…

1. Choose a decent but memorable password. (easy)

I would advise using a mix of upper AND lower-case letters, and numbers. For a unique twist, choose a numeric password, but hold down the Shift key when typing during the setup. Suddenly the not-so-secure 1234567, becomes a much trickier !”£$%^& for the wannabe password guesser. Just remember to hold Shift when typing the password into devices wishing to access your router.

2. Hide your SSID. (intermediate)

You know when you’re connecting a device to a wireless network you look for the network name first? That network name is know as the “SSID” to tech folk. And a popular thing for the security conscious to do is to hide the SSID, this way the device wishing to connect to a wireless network doesn’t only need to get the password right, but also the SSID too.

Because the network name is hidden, to connect a device to the network you normally have to choose the option of “Other…” (or similar) when looking for a network to connect to. This will then prompt you to enter the SSID, password and security type (WEP, WPA etc) for the network allowing the device to connect providing the correct details are input.

3. Enable MAC address filtering. (advanced)

Despite being an advanced feature, many domestic home broadband routers have this feature built-in, it just needs switching on and setting up. Check your router manual or if your router was supplied by your ISP contact them to see if your router supports MAC address filtering.

Every WiFi device has a unique MAC (Media Access Control) address assigned to it. Every laptop, smartphone, PC etc has a different MAC address. Imagine it like a fingerprint for WiFi devices. And you can set most routers to only allow specific MAC addresses to connect to your router wirelessly. So imagine if a hacker managed to get past the two steps above - so they worked out your password, worked out your SSID, they would fall at the third hurdle. Because their computers MAC address would not be recognised by the router, and therefore denied access to its services. Even an experienced hacker would find this method extremely difficult to beat.

Take note that users would need to remember that anytime a new device is introduced to the wireless network, they will need to input the MAC address of the new device into the router before it can gain access.

Summary

If you hire a professional to setup a wireless network at your home or business, and you’re looking for great security. I would highly recommend setting-up all three of the systems shown here. This way your wireless router is protected by three sequential layers of security. Protecting you, your family, your equipment, and your personal information.

For more tech waffle, and general I.T chat and tips, follow Shaun on Twitter at @actionjaxon666

Ever wanted to use Time Machine on your shiny feature-packed Mac, but never bothered to outlay the cash on an external hard drive or Apple Time Capsule? Well you don’t have to! You can use Time Machine with your existing internal hard drive, but you’ll have to give up a slice of your drive for it. Here’s how…
Note: This will not protect your data in the event of a hard drive failure. We also do not recommend this method for backing up your entire system. Only your Applications, Documents, Downloads etc. Space permitting.

Open Disk Utility, which can be found in Applications > Utilities folder.


Click your hard drive in the list on the left. But sure to select the drive itself, and not the primary partition which is branched-out underneath.


Click the Partition tab in the main window.


Click the plus (+) symbol at the bottom of the partition chart on the left.


Click the new partition that appears, likely named ‘Macintosh HD_2’, but not always.


Type the size you’d like your Time Machine drive to be in the fields on the main window.


Rename the partition ‘Time Machine HD’, for easy identification. Then click Apply.


Next, head to System Preferences > Time Machine.


Click Select Disk, and choose Time Machine HD from the list.


Now click Options.


Here we need to tell Time Machine what stuff NOT to backup. Hit the plus (+) symbol and choose all the main folders you don’t wish to backup. Folders such as Developer, Library & System are not needed for this kind of backup so be sure to choose those. Also goto Users > [Your Username] > [Your Home Folder] > Library and add that to the list too.


Time Machine will then begin backing up automatically. It will take a while, so you may wish to leave it alone for several hours to complete.

Pro Tip: For best results, just buy yourself an Apple Time Capsule ;)

Ever wanted to use Time Machine on your shiny feature-packed Mac, but never bothered to outlay the cash on an external hard drive or Apple Time Capsule? Well you don’t have to! You can use Time Machine with your existing internal hard drive, but you’ll have to give up a slice of your drive for it. Here’s how…

Note: This will not protect your data in the event of a hard drive failure. We also do not recommend this method for backing up your entire system. Only your Applications, Documents, Downloads etc. Space permitting.

  1. Open Disk Utility, which can be found in Applications > Utilities folder.

  2. Click your hard drive in the list on the left. But sure to select the drive itself, and not the primary partition which is branched-out underneath.

  3. Click the Partition tab in the main window.

  4. Click the plus (+) symbol at the bottom of the partition chart on the left.

  5. Click the new partition that appears, likely named ‘Macintosh HD_2’, but not always.

  6. Type the size you’d like your Time Machine drive to be in the fields on the main window.

  7. Rename the partition ‘Time Machine HD’, for easy identification. Then click Apply.

  8. Next, head to System Preferences > Time Machine.

  9. Click Select Disk, and choose Time Machine HD from the list.

  10. Now click Options.

  11. Here we need to tell Time Machine what stuff NOT to backup. Hit the plus (+) symbol and choose all the main folders you don’t wish to backup. Folders such as Developer, Library & System are not needed for this kind of backup so be sure to choose those. Also goto Users > [Your Username] > [Your Home Folder] > Library and add that to the list too.

  12. Time Machine will then begin backing up automatically. It will take a while, so you may wish to leave it alone for several hours to complete.

Pro Tip: For best results, just buy yourself an Apple Time Capsule ;)

Happy birthday Jenny! :) the triple-set is complete, Wii, Xbox, PS3. Gaming FTW.

Happy birthday Jenny! :) the triple-set is complete, Wii, Xbox, PS3. Gaming FTW.

My new ride! Today I picked up my 2009 Burton Supermodel snowboard, second hand but in absolutely mint condition. Used only a could of times this could pass as a ‘seconds’ board from a store. £250, complete with a mint condition set of 2009 Burton Exile bindings. Just need some boots now….

Hoo-rah! ;)

My new ride! Today I picked up my 2009 Burton Supermodel snowboard, second hand but in absolutely mint condition. Used only a could of times this could pass as a ‘seconds’ board from a store. £250, complete with a mint condition set of 2009 Burton Exile bindings. Just need some boots now….

Hoo-rah! ;)